Ratings and Viewership Jump Double-Digits for MTV Movie & TV Awards

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Ratings and viewership soared for this year’s MTV Movie & TV Awards, as the network strategically shifted the air date to a June Monday and commissioned the red-hot Tiffany Haddish as host.

Across 10 Viacom-owned networks, 3.371 million viewers (a 21 percent increase over 2017), watched as Millie Bobby Brown pushed back at bullies and Haddish spoofed the year’s top films and TV shows. Viewers in key demographics drove the ratings increase, with the 18-34 group surging from a 1.85 rating last year to 2.24 this year –  a 21 percent jump – and those 18-49 pushing from a 1.63 to 2.04 share, an increase of 25 percent. Looking solely at MTV and VH1, the numbers grew even more explosively, with a 30 percent jump among viewers 18-34 and a 35 percent rise in the 18-49 demo.

The buzz carried over to social, where the MTV Movie & TV Awards beat the World Cup for most social show on television (per Nielsen), nearly doubling last year’s total and setting show records with more than 83 million streams (and counting). #MTVAwards trended No. 1 in the U.S. and globally over the course of the two-hour telecast.

In order to maximize the show’s potential audience, MTV made a few calculated decisions when choosing its airdate. First, they moved the awards from their traditional Sunday broadcast to Monday, when MTV and VH1 tend to draw strong viewership.

Second, MTV pushed the show down the calendar from May to June, slotting it in the midst of the June pre-nomination Emmy-voting window. This strategic positioning may have encouraged star turnout – Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Chris Pratt, as well as cast members of Riverdale, Keeping Up with the Kardashians and Stranger Things all accepted their Golden Popcorn buckets onstage at Santa Monica’s Barker Hangar. This star power, in turn, could have drawn fans.

“The date change was a draw for networks and streaming platforms, and talent looking for opportunities to get their content out there during this key window,” MTV, VH1 and Logo General Manager Amy Doyle told Indiewire’s Michael Schneider before the awards aired. “And you’ll see that in full effect when watching the show.”

But the crisply edited, entertaining show drew a lot of attention on its own merits.

“After sitting through countless bloated awards shows indulging themselves for three or four hours at a time, the 2018 MTV Movie & TV Awards were a genuine relief — and in a delightful twist, even genuinely heartwarming,” wrote Variety’s Caroline Framke. “Airing Monday night after taping Saturday, the edited ceremony ran just two hours long but managed to squeeze in 15 awards, two musical performances, and several pre-taped sketches featuring host Tiffany Haddish. … By the night’s end, it was hard to understand why other awards show don’t follow suit more often.”

“… it was the best version of this show I’ve ever watched,” added Entertainment Weekly’s Darren Franich.

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Team Viacom Runs the Central Park Night at 42nd J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

The Viacom employees’ identical black racing shirts bore a lightning bolt back-dropping a three-word statement of intent: Run the Night. In the clear and humid May evening they did exactly that, dashing through 3.5 miles of hills and springtime trees in Manhattan’s Central Park, a 150-member collective scattered amid 15,000 workers from 329 companies bounding through the 42nd annual J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge.

Viacom employees gather before the first night of the J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge in Central Park on May 30, 2018.

Leading Team Viacom’s women’s group with a time of 25:42 was Alyssa Curci, a senior manager of vendor management in the company’s Media and Technology Services group.

“The energy was amazing,” Curci, who was participating in her first Corporate Challenge, recalled. “Everybody was excited to be there.”

Curci, who swam competitively at Division 1 Lehigh University, took up running after moving to New York City. She now runs three to five miles at least two days per week along the running paths that trace the rivers surrounding Manhattan.

As someone who joined Viacom just the month before the race, Curci appreciated elements of the challenge beyond the opportunity for an employer-sanctioned workout.

“I’m trying to meet a lot of the employees in Viacom, so this is a really nice opportunity,” Curci recalled. “When you’re the new person somewhere, it can be very intimidating, and you want to be a part of the group and a part of the family, and the fact that anyone who wanted to participate was allowed to was great. It’s an inviting culture, which is something that I really value about Viacom. It’s why I joined the company.”

Alyssa Curci, left, and Ross McGraw, right, finished tops in the female and male categories among their Viacom colleagues at the 2018 J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge.

For at least the third consecutive year, Ross McGraw finished first among all Viacom employees – and 15th overall – with a time of 18:47.

That McGraw finished near the top of the standings is little surprise – he is a committed athlete who placed first in the ITU World Triathlon in Bermuda earlier this year and will compete in triathlons in Philadelphia and New York City as a City Coach athlete over the coming two weekends. He will also compete in the USA Triathlon AG Nationals in Cleveland in August, race as an Elite-license-carrying Pro at the Ironman 70.3 in Lake Placid in September, and start as part of the Local Elite group in November’s New York City Marathon.

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“We Feel Great About Where Viacom Is Today,” CFO Wade Davis Tells Gabelli Conference

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

NEW YORK, NY – APRIL 08: Viacom CFO Wade Davis attends the 2014 UJA-Federation of New York’s Leadership Awards Dinner at Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers on April 8, 2014 in New York City. (Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

“We feel great about where Viacom is today,” Viacom Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Wade Davis told an audience of investors at the recent Gabelli Movie & Entertainment Conference. “From a fundamental standpoint, we think a lot of the strategies that we’ve been focused on and putting in place are paying off. … the first half of 2018, our fiscal 2018 is really a transition into delivering growth in the second half of 2018 and beyond, and we feel really good about that, focus 100 percent on delivering that.”

Here are a few more highlights from Davis’ remarks at the event. You can listen to the full event here.

Advanced Marketing Solutions and strong linear pricing are driving ad sales growth

“Pricing is incredibly strong right now in the linear market … So the growth is coming from what we call our Advanced Marketing Solutions portfolio or AMS [advanced addressable inventory and brand solutions]. So between those two areas – advanced addressable inventory where we’re activating new pools generally of non-linear inventory that are addressable in nature, and brand solutions – we have a portfolio business that as we’ve said publicly is going to approach $300 million this year. It’s really — it’s growing 40-plus-or-minus percent quarter-over-quarter, and we think that rate of growth will carry into 2019, and actually in the first part of 2019 accelerate.”

Growth comes over the top  

“So when you think about where Viacom is, we’re extremely well represented in the traditional distributor-led virtual MVPDs [multichannel video programming distributor]. That’s Sling, that’s DIRECTV NOW, and those are really the virtual MVPDs that matter. … We’d love to be on [Hulu and YouTube], we’re in discussions with those guys all the time. … And as we’ve gone through and stabilized our relationships with the traditional distributors, we’ve had a lot of success in getting ourselves very well positioned with respect to any virtual or OTT product that any of those traditional distributors will launch.”

Mobile is a global growth engine

“Mobile is a place where we’re significantly benefited by our global business. We made a lot of investments in bringing mobile bundles to market internationally. I guess we’ve announced at the moment five different partnerships that we have with mobile distributors around the world in which we’re licensing some form of bundle of our content into the mobile distributors. … And we’re in very advanced discussions with the three biggest operators in the United States, feel very good about where we’re positioned with them.”

Cornerstone networks in major international markets and mobile are driving growth outside the U.S.

“The [international] business is growing double digits, both top line and bottom line. … We operate in 180 countries. We have cornerstones in the biggest, most important markets, India and Asia, UK, which is the most attractive largest media market outside of the United States, and we’re the number one broadcaster in Argentina … And then there are some underlying trends that we think are different than the domestic market. … You do have a much more progressive mobile infrastructure [internationally]. As we said, a lot of these international markets, their principal Internet access is mobile and consequently their mobile offerings are a lot more mature. … And there’s also some of the same trends and tailwinds that we’re seeing in the SVOD [subscription video on demand] marketplace, domestically are starting to play themselves out globally.”

A “world-class team of operators” is transforming Paramount Pictures

“Every member of [Paramount Pictures’] senior management team except for the CFO is new. … We’ve completely overhauled all of the processes, the green light process, development process, global marketing, et cetera. So the business is running much more efficiently. We have a world class team of operators who bring new energy to the studio. … [and Paramount Television] should do about $400 million of revenue this year, and should, for the first time, be a contributor to operating income. It’s important to keep in mind that this is really still a startup. … it’s still in a growth phase, and we expect very, very strong double-digit growth on the revenue base above and beyond the $400 million that we expect this year.”

A “forever effort” transformation will save Viacom hundreds of millions of dollars

“…  when you think about our focus on margin enhancement, it really relates to efficiencies outside of content investment. So we’ve announced that we’ve undertaken a cost transformation effort. And for us, that’s not just a onetime restructuring. I think a lot of media companies and even Viacom historically would, from time to time, announce a restructuring in which they would write off some content, let some people go. But this is an effort that we view as a forever effort and something that’s part of the new culture that we’re trying to build. We have a team that’s a full-time team staffed focused on this. We’ve been very public about the amount of savings that we’re going to be able to deliver out of the current efforts being more than $100 million in the current year and in excess of $300 million in 2019 and beyond.”

A comprehensive reimagining of the content pipeline is connecting Viacom networks with their natural audiences

“The big issue for us and the big opportunity for us is bringing the focus that we’ve cited around our flagship six networks, being able to concentrate the spend where it matters most and being very precise about what the programming strategy and the brand promises for each of those brands. … So a good example of that is MTV which had historically been dabbling in very expensive scripted programming. That scripted programming is not programming that worked particularly well on MTV for MTV’s audience, and it consumed a ton of dollars for a very small amount of hours. Not enough hours to actually have MTV be a destination for high-end scripted dramas. So what we’ve done is we’ve concentrated our efforts around high-end scripted on the Paramount Network. As it relates to MTV it’s allowed us for really in some cases less money dramatically increased the amount of original programming that we have on the network, but most importantly, it’s programming that’s aligned with a vision that’s important to MTV’s audience.”

SpongeBob SquarePants’ Glittering, Inventive Set Design Wins Tony

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Glittering and inventive, a burst of pastels evoking its cartoon namesake, the set of SpongeBob SquarePants the Broadway Musical pumps riotous life into the critically acclaimed show. On Sunday evening, that backdrop, designed by Broadway veteran David Zinn, earned a Tony Award for Best Scenic Design of a Musical.

The set design, which The New York Times describes as “a bright, found-object aesthetic that mixes Pee-wee’s Playhouse, Etsy craft, classic MGM musicals and acid-house clubland,” marks Zinn’s second Tony (he earned top honors for Scenic Design of a Play in 2016 for his work on The Humans), and seventh nomination (he also earned a nomination for SpongeBob in this year’s costume design category).

The set bursts with an inventive array of found objects repurposed as SpongeBob’s undersea domain: pool noodles, floaty devices, shopping carts, umbrellas, surfboards. “In terms of influences, we referenced this sort of ’60s beach culture viewed through an ’80s sensibility,” Zinn told Time Out New York. “It was all about achieving beauty through a fun sensibility and simple materials.”

SpongeBob SquarePants, which earned a dozen total Tony nominations, is one of two current Broadway shows inspired by Viacom’s deep well of intellectual property. The other, Mean Girls, based on the 2004 Paramount Pictures film of the same name, earned 12 nominations. Both are an important part of Viacom’s deliberate strategic move into live events, where fans can connect with beloved characters in a new formats.

Both productions are ongoing in New York City. You can buy tickets to SpongeBob SquarePants at the Palace Theater here and to Mean Girls at the August Wilson Theater here.

Bumblebee Transforms Hailee Steinfeld’s Life in First Trailer

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Before The Last Knight or the Age of Extinction, before Decepticons started leveling American cities and destroying military bases, a yellow Volkswagen Beetle sits forgotten in a California junkyard. It’s been neglected long enough that a honeycomb of bees buzzes beneath its wheel well. Seventeen-year-old Charlie (Hailee Steinfeld), takes it home.

She gets more than a car. As Charlie slides beneath her new ride to inspect it, the bug erupts in an intricate flipping puzzle of zinging metal parts, rearranging itself into beloved Autobot Bumblebee.

“Let me tell you something, the driver don’t pick the car, the car pick the driver,” a hauntingly familiar voice-over – it’s the late Bernie Mac, warning Sam Wtiwicky (Shia LaBeouf) in 2007’s Transformers – announces at the trailer’s opening moments. “It’s a mystical bond between man and machine.”

In this case, it’s woman and machine (and a woman, Christina Hodson, wrote the script), but the bond between Charlie and Bumblebee looks as strong as any.

Hailee Steinfeld in BUMBLEBEE, from Paramount Pictures.

The two become great pals. They go to the beach. They go swimming. Charlie goes no-hands through the sunroof down the Pacific Coast Highway, perhaps pioneering the self-driving car in the film’s 1987 setting.

But things get hectic. The military lurks. So does dreaded Decepticon Starscream. Charlie gets banged up. Helicopters fall from the sky.

The film, helmed by Oscar-nominated Kubo and the Two Strings director Travis Knight, promises to wrap this action in a powerful story informed by the Transformers’ heritage. “I wanted to return to the essences of what made the Transformers franchise so impactful right from the beginning: character, emotion, spectacle,” Knight told attendees at April’s CinemaCon.

Which is not to say that echoes of Paramount Pictures’ five previous Transformers films won’t ricochet off the screen. “… and explosions,” Knight continued, “lots and lots of explosions.”

Bumblebee will debut in theaters Dec. 21, 2018. John Cena, Jorge Lendeborg Jr., John Ortiz, Jason Drucker, Pamela Adlon and Stephen Schneider will star alongside Steinfeld.

Viacom Forges Global Content Machine, Reinforcing Growing Premium Business

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Viacom’s rapidly growing international division has united two Latin American content powerhouses with its Viacom International Studios (VIS) production unit, transforming the studio into a global content machine with development, production and distribution capabilities. A number of SVOD, pay TV and free-to-air distribution deals will accompany the expansion, which complements and bolsters Viacom’s burgeoning premium content business.

The combination folds the production capabilities of wholly Viacom-owned Argentinian giant Telefe and majority-owned Brazilian comedy brand Porta dos Fundos under the same umbrella as the Miami-based studios that churn out Latin American content for Nickelodeon, MTV, Comedy Central and other Viacom brands.

“Since combining our production and sales forces last year after the acquisitions of Telefe and Porta dos Fundos, our focus has been on creating the highest-quality Spanish- and Portuguese-language content and expanding our distribution beyond Latin America, making the new Viacom International Studios a true global player in Latin American original content,” said VIMN Americas President Pierluigi Gazzolo. “With more than a decade of producing original, hit content for the Viacom brands, and expertise and content delivered through our acquisition of Telefe and investment in Porta dos Fundos, we are growing the reach of our product and client base with SVOD players, MVPDs and broadcast partners around the world. These partnerships are testament to the power of our brands and strength of our original productions.”

Viacom International Studios held a preview of upcoming content for new clients in May, shortly after Viacom announced the formation of the upgraded entity.

The reformulated VIS will inject global scale into many formerly regional properties, unlocking potential for high-quality content to reach a far larger audience. Fox Networks Latin America, for example, will distribute Telefe’s thriller movie Animal (from Oscar-winning screenwriter Armando Bo), on digital and linear platforms across the region, while Netflix will air the Comedy Central-Porta dos Fundos co-produced Borges in Latin America. Nickelodeon and Italy’s Rainbow Group will co-produce the 60-episode Club 57 time-travel epic, with VIS handling global distribution and Rainbow Group retaining rights in their home country.

Viacom President and CEO Bob Bakish hinted at the potential of distributing local content across worldwide channels at the recent MoffettNathanson Media & Communications Summit in New York City.

“But those local cornerstones are not only about our strength in those particular markets, but they’re also content engines more broadly, and one of the things you’re going to see that you haven’t really seen yet is our Telefe asset becoming a major producer of novela product for the world,” he said. “We’re going to be distributing about 700 hours globally, that’s not something that Telefe used to do. It’s something I’m very excited about.”

This ramping up of Spanish- and Portuguese-language content production with studios in Miami, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro will act as a powerful international complement to Viacom’s burgeoning premium content capabilities under Paramount Pictures’ Paramount Television production studio. Behind hits such as USA Network’s Shooter, Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why, and TNT’s The Alienist, Paramount Television has grown from nothing just a few years ago into a sought-after production hub with anticipated revenues of $400 million in 2018 alone.

“We’ve Made a Lot of Progress at Viacom” – CEO Bob Bakish Touts Achievements at MoffettNathanson

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Growing viewership, building new management teams, finding efficiencies, delivering content on next-generation platforms. Viacom President and CEO Bob Bakish sat down with Michael B. Nathanson at last week’s MoffettNathanson Media & Communications Summit in New York City, where they discussed these and other ways that Viacom is strategically positioning itself to thrive in a rapidly evolving media landscape.

“I fundamentally believe we’ve made a lot of progress at Viacom in the last year or so,” Bakish said. “That starts with having a plan and laying it out for our teams, our employees, and quite frankly, the rest of the industry and the financial community. … For the last couple of quarters, we’ve seen consistent share growth, including in the last quarter. And in fact, we’re seeing improvement relative to last quarter and the current quarter we’re in. So that’s clear progress.”

Additional highlights from the conversation are below. Listen to the full exchange here.

Next-generation platforms and solutions are driving a huge potential growth market for Viacom

Viacom Digital Studios, announced late last year and launched in earnest at the recent Newfronts in New York, is just getting going, but has already stoked strong digital consumption, with video views up 110 percent year-over-year last month. This is just one part of a broad suite of digital initiatives – from vMVPD (virtual multichannel video programming distributor) distribution over Sling and DIRECTV NOW to deals with Telfonica (across Latin America), Telkomsel (Indonesia) and other mobile providers – that is positioning Viacom to evolve with its increasingly digital-first fanbase.

“So when we talk about next generation, we’re talking about vMVPDs. We’re talking about OTT (over the top). We’re talking about sort of AVOD (audio/visual on demand), in front of the wall, social, et cetera. And we have initiatives going in all of those spaces. And the reason we’re in all of those spaces is we believe that’s a very powerful complement to what we’re doing in the traditional space and is critical to driving growth.”

New management is driving ratings growth across the core television business

MTV is riding an unscripted boom to 10 straight months of ratings growth under network President Chris McCarthy, while ratings are up at BET behind a scripted programming push and at Comedy Central as Trevor Noah solidifies himself as a major voice in late-night.

“So, I feel good about our trajectory there, and in fact, again, when you met with advertisers and we did dinners with each of the agency holding companies over the last three weeks or so … what we typically heard … was, ‘wow, you guys made a lot of sort of promises and commitments when we saw you last year … And we were somewhat skeptical but it’s really incredible how far you’ve come and seeing these brands and we’re very excited about your upcoming slates,’ as are we, by the way,” Bakish said.

Paramount Pictures’ new management team is turning the studio around…

Under Chairman and CEO Jim Gianopulos, the iconic movie studio has installed a new management team and reoriented its slate so that half of its films are co-branded with Viacom’s media networks. With A Quiet Place – the first film produced, marketed and distributed under the new team – rolling out to more than $300 million in worldwide box office receipts (so far), on a $20 million budget, the studio has plenty of momentum moving into the summer.

“And if you look at Paramount, we have a plan that management is totally bought into that is about, that addresses some of our historical problems and our historical problems were a slate construction that didn’t make sense, was not balanced, didn’t leverage the assets Viacom had and then frankly poor execution,” said Bakish “… look at the branded films, the first one in this kind of era is going to be a BET film shot by Tyler Perry [starring Tiffany Haddish] … That’s a film that we made at a very attractive price point, and it’s going to benefit from the BET brand, and that’s why Tyler came and left a perfectly good existence at Discovery and Lionsgate to unify his content output with Viacom … So we are going to rapidly take share, it’s going to be profitable share and we’re going to combine that with our television business and that’s going to take us back very quickly to a very nice business.”

…while the Paramount TV production studio evolves into a premium content force

With 19 network projects in the pipeline and hits such as Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why and TNT’s The Alienist stamping the studio’s premium content credentials, Paramount Television is expected to deliver $400 million in fiscal 2018 revenue.

“When suddenly Viacom split with CBS, the TV production went with CBS and therefore we had a kind of naked film-only studio, which is not a good place for a studio to be because very lumpy,” Bakish said. “Television tends to kind of flatten out the volatility year-to-year, as well as, of course add value. … Paramount is rapidly being appreciated as a place that makes hits in television too.”

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Paramount’s Gianopulos Moves Studio Forward Behind Movies, TV, and 106-Year-Old Library

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

As a movie studio with a diversified upcoming slate and powerful television production arm, reinforced with an iconic century-old library, Paramount Pictures is well positioned to thrive far into the future, according to President and CEO Jim Gianopulos.

The studio head, who has built a new management team since taking the helm at Paramount last year, sat down with CNN Money’s Dylan Byers at the Milken Institute Global Conference earlier this month to discuss the resurgent business.

“We’re content creators,” Gianopulos said. “We’re storytellers. For us, our primary focus is theatrical distribution as a studio, and, in television, the creation of television programming.”

LAS VEGAS, NV – APRIL 25: Jim Gianopulos speaks onstage during the 2018 CinemaCon – Paramount Pictures special summer presentation held at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace on April 25, 2018 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Michael Tran/FilmMagic)

Television Production Ramps Up As Diverse Theatrical Slate Debuts

Both sides of the business – television and theatrical – have powerful catalysts driving them. The Paramount Television production studio, which has grown rapidly behind a string of premium-content hits such as Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why, TNT’s The Alienist, and USA Network’s Shooter, is on track to reach $400 million in revenues this year.

The forthcoming theatrical slate, which has been rejiggered under the current management team, will include sequels, reboots, animated films, and tie-ins to other Viacom brands through its Paramount Players division. At last month’s CinemaCon, Gianopulos detailed this lineup, which stands out for its diverse offerings that will appeal to both mass and niche audiences.

“We have an old saying that’s always worked for us – make it for someone, or make it for everyone,” he said, citing the forthcoming Mission: Impossible – Fallout and recent smash hit A Quiet Place as projects with mass appeal.

Meanwhile, Book Club – set to drop in theaters this Friday with a headlining cast of Diane Keaton, Jane Fonda, Candice Bergen and Mary Steenburgen – has been tailor-made to appeal to an adult female demographic.

“For them, that is Star Wars,” he said. “That’s their movie. Something that people feel an identity to. They made this for me. This is something relevant and relatable to me. You can continue to make a broad variety of films, and in the process, be very successful.”

A Rich History That Continues to Build the Present

For all the buzz around the studio’s yet-to-be-released films, one of Paramount’s under-appreciated strengths is its deep content warehouse that stretches back to the dawn of the industry.

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Trevor Noah on Trump, the Daily Show’s Purpose, and Planning for Choas, With CNN’s Brian Stelter

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

 

“I wake up most days terrified at the notion that Donald Trump is the most powerful president in the world,” Comedy Central’s Trevor Noah tells CNN Money’s Brian Stelter in an interview on Reliable Sources. “I also wake up most days acknowledging that he’s going to make me laugh. And that’s what’s difficult for me is that he’s an emotional paradox. It’s almost like there’s an asteroid headed toward the earth, but it’s shaped like a penis. I think I’m gonna die, but I know I’m gonna laugh.”

In the six-plus-minute interview excerpt shot on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah’s New York City set and posted above, Noah also compares Trump to an African dictator, explains how his team plans for the unplannable vagaries of life under the president, and provides insight into how he chooses the night’s stories from among seemingly limitless options.

And even though the show is the flagship of a network with “comedy” in its name, Noah sees its purpose as much more than just making people laugh. “When I first started at The Daily Show, I thought our purpose was just to make jokes about what’s happening, because that’s what the world felt like, it was a benign existence under Barack Obama,” he says. “I think, as the world comes to change, our purpose in that world changes. … As the world becomes less secure, that’s when comedy becomes more cutting, because it’s the release valve to that tension.”

Listen to the full interview here.

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, which recently brought in four Webby and Webby People’s Voice Awards, is an important driver of the ratings surge at Comedy Central, which has started 2018 with four consecutive months of year-over-year ratings gains in the key adults-18-to-49 demo. Vicom recently signed a broad long-term strategic partnership with Noah’s Day Zero Productions that includes television, feature film, digital and short-form video content. Late last year, the network renewed Noah’s Daily Show hosting contract through 2022.

Viacom Takes Five Outer Critics Circle Awards, SpongeBob Leads Musicals with Four

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

After securing 12 Tony Award nominations apiece last week, SpongeBob SquarePants: The Musical and Mean Girls have each clinched at least one Outer Critics Circle Award.

The Nickelodeon production, which plants the network’s iconic anthropomorphic sponge in the middle of his first Broadway caper, took four awards – more than any other musical – including top honors for best new musical. Paramount Pictures’ and Broadway Video’s co-produced Mean Girls, based upon the 2004 movie of the same name, earned an additional honor, bringing Viacom’s total Outer Critics Circle count to five.

The announcements come as Viacom moves more deliberately into the live event space, translating its brands’ beloved characters and stories into immersive experiences that transcend the screen.

Here are the categories in which the Outer Critics Circle judges awarded top honors to Viacom’s Broadway musicals:

SPONGEBOB SQUAREPANTS THE MUSICAL

  • Outstanding New Broadway Musical
  • Best New Score – Jonathan Coulton, David Bowie and Brian Eno, Plain White T’s, T.I., Domani Harris, and Darwin Quinn, Brendon Urie of Panic! At the Disco, Alexander Ebert of Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, Cyndi Lauper and Rob Hyman, Yolanda Adams, The Flaming Lips, Sara Bareilles, Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith, Lady Antebellum, John Legend, They Might Be Giants, Andy Paley and Tom Kenny, Derek Drymon, Mark Harrison, Stephen Hillenburg, and Blaise Smith, and Tom Kitt
  • Best Actor in a Musical – Ethan Slater
  • Best Director of a Musical – Tina Landau*

Danny Skinner as Patrick Star and Ethan Slater as SpongeBob SquarePants. Photo by Joan Marcus, 2017.

MEAN GIRLS

  • Outstanding Book of a Musical – Tina Fey

Broadway awards season is just ramping up – both musicals are still eligible for multiple honors from the Drama Desk Awards, which will announce its winners on June 3, and the Tony Awards, which will air live on CBS on June 10.

*Tied with Bart Sher, My Fair Lady