Four Reasons Critics Love Comedy Central’s Detroiters

Stuart Winchester by Stuart Winchester, Viacom
Detroiters - 824

Tim Robinson and Sam Richardson have inherited a once-great Detroit ad agency on Comedy Central’s hilarious new series, Detroiters. Photo from Comedy Central Press.

They crash the steakhouse luncheons of high-flying auto executives. They know the local garbage truck drivers by name. They’ve devised elaborate rituals around bathroom breaks.

They are Detroiters, and they have landed at Comedy Central with a new half-hour show, bringing delighted reviews along with them.

Starring Sam Duvet (Sam Richardson – Richard Splett on Veep) and Tim Cramblin (Tim Robinson – Saturday Night Live), both alumni of the famed Second City comedy club (watch them here), and native Detroiters themselves, the comedy delivers plenty to satisfy critics, fans, and native Michiganders:

1) It’s hilarious

The duo inherited a Detroit advertising business when Tim’s father “went insane.” Their office, bedecked in the drab and lightless décor of some long-ago era, has been emptied of most employees and all major clients, which once included such blue chips as Budweiser and Delta Air Lines.

Despite occasional zealous pursuits of big-name clients, they remain hapless and amusingly frustrated. It often feels as though Sam and Tim are a couple of amped-up teenagers left unsupervised while dad is off for a brief business meeting – in the first episode, the duo is sidetracked from an urgent deadline by an extended experiment to shatter the “unbreakable” glass panel beside Tim’s office door.

Such mishaps are unending. They run over a Chrysler executive on a way to pitch him. Sam is mistaken for a male prostitute – and rolls with it. A shoot promoting a mirror store is botched – because Sam and Tim are reflected in all of the shots. Their film school editor transforms a kitschy hot tub commercial into an art-house meditation on life and middle age and makes their client – Eddie Champagne, the hot tub king of Detroit – look like a creep.

That Sam and Tim remain so rambunctiously unselfconscious throughout these shenanigans, and that they keep trying to win business and remain friends, balances the absurdity with an endearing dimension. “The new Comedy Central series … is also an opportunity for Richardson and Robinson to dive into absurd situations and physical comedy with an admirable lack of inhibition,” writes Vulture’s Jen Chaney. “There is no ridiculous moment whose boundaries can’t be pushed that much further, into even more ridiculous territory.”

Read More

MTV + Movies + Television = The MTV Movie & TV Awards

Stuart Winchester by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Since Demi Moore announced Terminator 2: Judgement Day as Best Movie from a Burbank stage in June of 1992, the MTV Movie Awards have celebrated the best of Hollywood’s explosive, moving, heart-pounding annual slate – with an MTV-appropriate musical touch delivered by the big name performers of the day (that inaugural show included En Vogue, Ugly Kid Joe, and Arrested Development).

After 25 years of Golden Popcorn statues and hijinks that have included Jim Carrey crashing the stage as an anonymous hippie, Rainn Wilson gearing up in nothing but a Teddy bear, and lots of surprise makeout sessions, MTV is taking a great thing and making it even better, with the inclusion of television in its award categories. The network has officially renamed the show the MTV Movie & TV Awards.

MTV Movie and TV Awards

“We’re living in a golden age of content, and great storytelling and characters resonate regardless of whether you’re watching it in a theater or on TV,” said MTV President Chris McCarthy. “The new MTV Movie & TV Awards will celebrate even more of the brightest, bravest, funniest and most shared films and TV shows resonating across youth culture.”

Read More

An Open Letter to the Industry from Fox Networks Group, Turner and Viacom

Along with Fox Networks Group and Turner, we are pleased announce OpenAP, TV’s Advanced Audience Platform. Founded by a consortium of television publishers and operated by a leading, neutral third-party auditor, OpenAP is the television industry’s first open platform for cross-publisher audience targeting and independent measurement.

The letter can be viewed below.

Read More

3 Days, 5 Stages, Over 50 Comedians and Bands: Everything You Need to Know About Comedy Central’s Festival Behemoth

For festival fanatics, March means narrowing down your summer wish-list. Coachella, Firefly, or Mysteryland? Should you purchase a one-day pass, or go full-throttle and get the four-day VIP experience? How much time can you take off work to devote to camping in a desert?

Now there’s a new contender: Comedy Central Presents Colossal Clusterfest.

Comedy Central’s inaugural festival is, as its name implies, focused on comedy. But the San Francisco event’s lineup is full of more than just laughs. This entertainment bonanza features music, branded attractions and delectable cuisine from local restaurants and wineries.

Read More

Australian Dads, Internet Habits of Global Youth, and Playful Learning for Preschoolers’ Parents – Viacom International Insights

Christian Kurz by Christian Kurz, Global Consumer Insights, Viacom

International Insights Digest: March 2017

Welcome to the March issue of the Viacom Global Insights Digest, bringing you Viacom’s latest consumer insights from around the world.

This month, we look at today’s Australian dads, the life strategies and hybrid online/offline worlds of global youth, and the value of technology and playful learning to preschoolers’ parents.

As always, the English version of our blog is home to these stories and many more. All stories are available in Spanish (LatAm) and Portuguese (Brazilian).

Read More