Four Reasons Critics Love Comedy Central’s Detroiters

Stuart Winchester by Stuart Winchester, Viacom
Detroiters - 824

Tim Robinson and Sam Richardson have inherited a once-great Detroit ad agency on Comedy Central’s hilarious new series, Detroiters. Photo from Comedy Central Press.

They crash the steakhouse luncheons of high-flying auto executives. They know the local garbage truck drivers by name. They’ve devised elaborate rituals around bathroom breaks.

They are Detroiters, and they have landed at Comedy Central with a new half-hour show, bringing delighted reviews along with them.

Starring Sam Duvet (Sam Richardson – Richard Splett on Veep) and Tim Cramblin (Tim Robinson – Saturday Night Live), both alumni of the famed Second City comedy club (watch them here), and native Detroiters themselves, the comedy delivers plenty to satisfy critics, fans, and native Michiganders:

1) It’s hilarious

The duo inherited a Detroit advertising business when Tim’s father “went insane.” Their office, bedecked in the drab and lightless décor of some long-ago era, has been emptied of most employees and all major clients, which once included such blue chips as Budweiser and Delta Air Lines.

Despite occasional zealous pursuits of big-name clients, they remain hapless and amusingly frustrated. It often feels as though Sam and Tim are a couple of amped-up teenagers left unsupervised while dad is off for a brief business meeting – in the first episode, the duo is sidetracked from an urgent deadline by an extended experiment to shatter the “unbreakable” glass panel beside Tim’s office door.

Such mishaps are unending. They run over a Chrysler executive on a way to pitch him. Sam is mistaken for a male prostitute – and rolls with it. A shoot promoting a mirror store is botched – because Sam and Tim are reflected in all of the shots. Their film school editor transforms a kitschy hot tub commercial into an art-house meditation on life and middle age and makes their client – Eddie Champagne, the hot tub king of Detroit – look like a creep.

That Sam and Tim remain so rambunctiously unselfconscious throughout these shenanigans, and that they keep trying to win business and remain friends, balances the absurdity with an endearing dimension. “The new Comedy Central series … is also an opportunity for Richardson and Robinson to dive into absurd situations and physical comedy with an admirable lack of inhibition,” writes Vulture’s Jen Chaney. “There is no ridiculous moment whose boundaries can’t be pushed that much further, into even more ridiculous territory.”

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TRANSFORM-ing Detroit

Chanel J Cathey 1 by Chanel Cathey, Viacom

 Allegra Clegg

More businesses, artists, activists and entrepreneurs are focusing on Detroit as a hotbed for innovation and inspiration. In 2010, Paramount Pictures filmed Transformers: Dark of the Moon in Detroit and this year marked the production return of the 4th installment of the franchise, Transformers: Age of Extinction. Filming in the Motor City brings a pleasant boost to the economy, and last week the franchise also lifted the spirits of hundreds of young people at Durfee Elementary-Middle School, when throngs of excited students welcomed Transformer co-producer and Hollywood all-star Allegra Clegg to their school.

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