Trevor Noah on Trump, the Daily Show’s Purpose, and Planning for Choas, With CNN’s Brian Stelter

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

 

“I wake up most days terrified at the notion that Donald Trump is the most powerful president in the world,” Comedy Central’s Trevor Noah tells CNN Money’s Brian Stelter in an interview on Reliable Sources. “I also wake up most days acknowledging that he’s going to make me laugh. And that’s what’s difficult for me is that he’s an emotional paradox. It’s almost like there’s an asteroid headed toward the earth, but it’s shaped like a penis. I think I’m gonna die, but I know I’m gonna laugh.”

In the six-plus-minute interview excerpt shot on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah’s New York City set and posted above, Noah also compares Trump to an African dictator, explains how his team plans for the unplannable vagaries of life under the president, and provides insight into how he chooses the night’s stories from among seemingly limitless options.

And even though the show is the flagship of a network with “comedy” in its name, Noah sees its purpose as much more than just making people laugh. “When I first started at The Daily Show, I thought our purpose was just to make jokes about what’s happening, because that’s what the world felt like, it was a benign existence under Barack Obama,” he says. “I think, as the world comes to change, our purpose in that world changes. … As the world becomes less secure, that’s when comedy becomes more cutting, because it’s the release valve to that tension.”

Listen to the full interview here.

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah, which recently brought in four Webby and Webby People’s Voice Awards, is an important driver of the ratings surge at Comedy Central, which has started 2018 with four consecutive months of year-over-year ratings gains in the key adults-18-to-49 demo. Vicom recently signed a broad long-term strategic partnership with Noah’s Day Zero Productions that includes television, feature film, digital and short-form video content. Late last year, the network renewed Noah’s Daily Show hosting contract through 2022.

Exploring the Trump/Hip-Hop Conundrum at Viacom HQ

“How can the country that elected Donald Trump president be the same country that rates hip-hop as the number one mainstream genre?”

This is the question that opened Viacom’s Hype & Influence panel, moderated by Marketing Strategy’s Brooke Ozaydinli and featuring MTV’s Wanda Coriano, BET Music & Talent’s Bianca Edwards, and rapper Maliibu Miitch. The exploration of the state of Hip-Hop in today’s culture was a Black History Month event organized at the company’s Times Square headquarters by The BEAT (Viacom’s employee resource group devoted to the African-American experience), the Marketing Strategy team, and the BET Music Meeting.

“It’s not surprising,” Edwards said to Ozaydinli’s opening question, “because hip-hop thrives in environments with oppression and adversity.”

The Hype & Influence panel built on a video series of the same name, created by Viacom’s V By Viacom platform to explore cultural trends. The first edition, featuring BET’s Connie Orlando, 300 Entertainment co-founder Kevin Liles, and Miitch explored the same themes as the panel, which opened with a viewing:

Here are a few other highlights from the afternoon, from thoughts on the authenticity of Cardi B to the power and potential perils of hip-hop:

“People are used to everything being cookie-cutter”

Miitch addressed why she thought people connected with Cardi B, whose Bodak Yellow video has been viewed nearly a half billion times on YouTube. “People are used to everything being cookie-cutter,” she said, “but with an artist like Cardi, who doesn’t filter herself, people connect with her because she says out loud the things that people are thinking.”

Sparking a love of music

Coriano grew up in The Bronx hearing hip-hop on the streets, forming the foundation of her love for music across genres. “Living in the Bronx, hip-hop was my music and it was the music of that time.”

Maliibu Miitch and members of her Atlantic Records management team at the Hype & Influence panel, held at Viacom’s Times Square headquarters in honor of Black History Month. Photo by Pound & Grain.

Should children listen to hip-hop?

During the event’s question-and-answer portion, I sparked an extended debate when I asked about the relationship between kids and hip-hop. Miitch argued that parents do a lot of things in front of their kids that could be deemed worse than what artists rap about. “People rap about their truth and it’s not something to hide from children,” she said.

Coriano made the point that kids don’t always understand what is being said, and sometimes just like a song because they can dance to it or it has a nice beat. You can keep kids away from that sort of music, or give them a censored version, since many elements of hip-hop can be educational – she pointed to Logic’s 1-800-273-8255 or Kendrick Lamar’s songs about Injustice.

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It’s Trump Versus Everyone Else in Trevor Noah’s Bullsh*t Third Month Mania Tournament

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

March Madness has descended upon America, giving sports fans everywhere the chance to apply their basketball acumen to predict who will prevail in the frantic, single-elimination crucible of the NCAA tournament.

But where’s the fun in that?

If you are part of that vast group of Americans who eschew lame rules-based competition in favor of contests determined by finding the most people who agree with you, then The Daily Show with Trevor Noah’s Third Month Mania Bullshit tournament is for you.

The contest, consisting of 64 entries evenly divided between The Trump Conference and the Everything Else Conference, will ask voters to answer a simple question, best summed up by Noah himself:

“What bullshit was the bullshittiest bullshit of the last year?”

Indeed, there are a lot of good choices. On the Trump side, the president’s claims that his was the largest inauguration crowd in history, that rampant voter fraud cost him the popular vote, that President Obama tapped his Trump Tower phone lines, and that there were “very fine people on both sides” of the August rally in Charlottesville take the top seeds.

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Is Trevor Noah Dishonest and Corrupt Enough to Win Trump’s Honor?

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

How does a U.S. president follow up a Twitter threat to start a nuclear war with America’s external enemies?

With a promise to strike the malcontents who are most ferociously attacking the nation from within – the mainstream media:

Comedy Central’s Daily Show host Trevor Noah could barely contain his excitement at this proclamation from the Very-Stable-Genius-in-Chief.

“After provoking North Korea and then insulting Palestine, the President turned to America’s greatest foe: the fake-news media,” Noah said of Trump’s announcement. “So that was Donald Trump’s day on Twitter. The bad news is he’s itching to start a nuclear war. The good news is, despite his threats to Korea, at least he thinks we’re going to make it until Monday.”

And the better news for fans is that, despite Trump pushing the awards until Wednesday, Noah is lobbying hard to win this distinction. In the grand tradition of “for your consideration” awards season self-promotion, Noah turned to the “failing” (according to Trump), New York Times to promote himself as the best possible candidate for the president’s prize:

Noah even plastered his qualifications on a Times Square billboard (on the north side of Viacom’s HQ at 1515 Broadway):

Noah will have plenty of competition, including Comedy Central alums Stephen Colbert and Samantha Bee, who are running their own furious campaigns for this high honor. Noah is not intimidated. “President Trump, don’t be faked out by their fake fake-outs,” a narrator says on a Daily Show-sponsored ad dismissing Colbert and Bee as fake fakers. “When you cast your vote on Monday, vote for The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. He covers you very unfairly, and he’s literally un-American.”

It’s true (though don’t hold that against them): Noah is from South Africa.

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Trumped Out? Broad City’s Tr**p-No-More Browser Extender Can Help

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

We may have collectively overdone it.

In the politics-everywhere-all-the-time days of 2017, it can be tough to find a zone of existence in which you don’t encounter the name of a certain commander in chief.

Comedy Central’s Broad City is here to help. After censoring the president’s name throughout the current season of the show, Abbi and Ilana have extended their efforts online, where you can download a Trump-No-More browser extension. Once you add this handy internet supplement, “Trump” will appear as “Tr**p” on pretty much any page you visit.

Here’s how to get started:

How well does the tool work? Well, here’s a screenshot of Donald Tr**p’s Wikipedia page before downloading the extension:

And after:

So there’s a little less politics in your life, and a little more Broad City.

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Four Reasons to Go See Al Gore’s Hopeful, Compelling An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power rattles out of a world where typhoons and wildfires wail and rage, where warm climate-fueled Zika virus menaces an ever-widening swath of the globe, where streets melt in India, where the coastal United States is swamped on normal days (sunny day flooding in Miami) and extraordinary ones (Hurricane Sandy in New York City).

Directed by Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk, Al Gore’s sequel to his Oscar-winning 2006 An Inconvenient Truth hits just two months after President Donald Trump pulled the U.S. out of the 195-nation Paris climate agreement. While the timing of the film’s release is coincidental, An Inconvenient Sequel acts as an emphatic counterpoint to the climate-denying, march-with-fingers-in-our-ears-saying-la-la-la-as-the-planet-catastrophically-warms crowd. Here are five reasons to go see it as soon as possible:

1) The documentary frames climate change in an easy-to-understand way

One of the great strengths of An Inconvenient Truth was its distillation of a complex global phenomenon into black-and-white data points. While the sequel has dispensed with the Power- Point-as-documentary narrative device of its predecessor, Gore nonetheless synthesizes the intricate into the straightforward, this time with a blend of graphics and anecdotes

“The man is wonky, no question. But that’s what has made his climate-change crusade persuasive for so many,” writes Bob Mondello on NPR.org. “He gets the figures, turns them into easily digested factoids, says things that initially sound outrageous, and handles the pushback. … The single most exhilarating moment may come from a bar graph — seriously, you’ll want to cheer — but there’s no shortage of human stories on screen: The woman whose shoe gets stuck in pavement that’s melted from the heat.”

That is not to say that the film is without nuance. When Gore evacuates from his Paris venue as ISIS-affiliated terrorists slaughtered 130 people around the city in November 2015, it inspires a cause-and-affect musing that lays out the complexity of the global climate jigsaw puzzle: a drought in Syria led indirectly to social upheaval and civil war, which pried open the social order enough to let ISIS thrive and propagate throughout the world.

VP Al Gore with former Mayor of Tacloban City Alfred Romualdez and Typhoon Haiyan survivor Demi Raya, in the Raya family home; Tacloban City, Philippines, March 12, 2016

2) Climate change is not a partisan issue 

Dale Ross is a proud Republican-voting Texan, mayor of Georgetown, “the reddest city in the reddest county in Texas.” And yet, he has oriented his city to become the first in the state that will be 100 percent renewable. Asked why, he said that it simply made economic sense to do so.

“It’s a heartening moment at a time of horrendous political division, but it’s also central to the movie’s approach, which is to insist on facts over ideology and show why it’s a good idea to present the practical as well as the moral argument,” writes Newsweek’s Charles Taylor.

By stripping out partisan moralizing and reframing the argument in economic terms, Gore is both conceding Republicans’ economy-first argument and providing them an excuse to reconsider alternative energy sources without having to admit that such actions could forestall a climate shift. Who cares, after all, when your utility bills are lower?

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The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Where Fake Correspondents Become Real Stars

The Daily Show With Trevor Noah puts a surrealist spin on American politics with its daily takedowns of all that is obscene, absurd and inexplicable in Washington, D.C. By doing so, the satirical news source not only fills a vital role in U.S. entertainment and media, but it also incubates a steady stream of rising on-air talent. Lately, those correspondents who report alongside Noah have been showing up all over the place, re-affirming the show’s role as one of the premier talent incubators on TV today.

The Daily Show’s Jordan Klepper is breaking out into a new role as host of a late-night show of his own, which will air weeknights following The Daily Show, while Hasan Minhaj entertained a constellation of elite journalist, celebrities, and politicians at the 2017 White House Correspondents’ Dinner (WHCD), an event typically attended by the president.

But Trump opted to skip the dinner in favor of holding a rally in Harrisburg Pennsylvania, after announcing in February that he would be the first president to skip the event since Ronald Reagan (who was recuperating after being shot) in 1981. Journalists predicted this year’s soirée would be unconventional. And it was.

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Daily Show Correspondent Hasan Minhaj to Perform at White House Correspondents Dinner

While President Trump is skipping April’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner (the first time a president has done so in 30 years), The Daily Show With Trevor Noah senior correspondent Hasan Minhaj will be featured entertainer for the hundreds of Washington journalists in attendance.

“It is a tremendous honor to be a part of such a historic event even though the president has chosen not to attend this year. SAD!” Minhaj quipped in a statement. “Now more than ever, it is vital that we honor the First Amendment and the freedom of the press.”

With his Daily Show pedigree, Minhaj is no stranger to political satire—especially when it comes to our commander in chief:

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What Is the Greatest Trump Tweet of All Time? Trevor Noah Explores the Art of the Tweet

NCAA’s March Madness basketball extravaganza wasn’t the only bracket tournament captivating Americans last month. Third Month Mania, orchestrated by Comedy Central’s The Daily Show With Trevor Noah, waded through the nearly 35,000 Donald Trump tweets to identify his greatest Twitter post of all time.

Trump Tweet

Courtesy of Comedy Central.

Third Month Mania was a truly “unpresidented” contest, yet its turnout was “yuge.” More than 6 million viewers delved into Trump’s Twitter archives to find the most outlandish tweet, and Noah announced the winner on Wednesday night’s episode.

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Fake Trump Dodges Real Media with Comedy Central Show of His Own

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Comedy Central is on a sizzling late-night run, as The Daily Show with Trevor Noah knocked out its highest-rated and most-watched quarter ever for the first quarter of 2017. It is the number one daily late-night talk show among millennials and the only one of that group to increase year-over-year ratings and viewership.

There has been so much winning that the network has attracted the self-proclaimed winningest winner of all to late night: U.S. President Donald J. Trump.

via GIPHY

Well, sort of. Renowned Trump impersonator Anthony Atamanuik will helm The President Show, a weekly production that purports to be broadcast direct from the Oval Office, where the faux commander in chief can circumvent the crooked media’s fake news factories for straight Trump talk.

How good is Atamanuik-as-Trump? Pretty flawless:

“Laughing at the President is a proud American tradition and we hope not to disappoint anyone in that department,” said Atamanuik. “But our political system is too broken for us to be content joking about one man, even though he is a disastrous silly little toddler boy. Mostly I’d just like to thank Comedy Central for giving us this platform to speak truth to power and if we’re lucky, end up in prison!”

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