Viacom Global Insights, December Edition: TV’s Continued Importance, Kids’ Passion Points and More

by Christian Kurz, Global Consumer Insights, Viacom

Viacom’s latest consumer insights from around the world include TV’s continued importance, kids’ passion points, how the internet fosters unity, Filipino kids’ purchase influence, and happiness in Asia-Pacific countries. As always, you can read these and all our stories in English, Latin American Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese.

Our latest study on global TV habits finds that in viewers’ lives, TV is as essential as ever.
A recent project looks at today’s top passion points among kids in 30 countries.
A new infographic reveals stats on how the internet is opening people’s minds and inspiring them to make the world a better place.
Filipino kids are more likely to live with grandparents and help out other relatives, broadening their influence over family decisions.
People are happier and less focused on material success in Asia-Pacific countries than 5 years ago, according to a recent study.

Viacom Makes Working Mothers’ Best Companies List for Seventh Year – 12 Moms Help Explain Why

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

For the seventh consecutive year, Working Mother has named Viacom to its list of 100 Best Companies. The reasons why Viacom is a great place to be a mom are plentiful, including:

  • 10 paid weeks of maternity leave
  • $15,000 in assistance for anyone adopting or fostering a child, or using a surrogate
  • A fertility concierge service that connects employees to patient advocates, nurses, genetic counselors, and surrogacy and donor specialists
  • 25 days of subsidized care-giving for children (or adults) per year
  • Access to lactation experts
  • The ability to ship breast milk home from business trips

But the best people to explain why Viacom so consistently makes Working Mother’s list is the moms themselves. We asked a dozen of them why this company was such a great destination for women who don’t want to have to choose between family and career:

Helen Adair, Learning & Development – 

“Viacom allows me the flexibility to have a rewarding career while balancing my family commitments with two children. I also appreciate The Parenthood – our employee resource group for working parents that offers educational sessions and resources for parents, fun events and chances to connect with fellow working parents. And my kids absolutely love coming to the Paramount Lot for movie screenings and the Annual Tree Lighting celebration. I love that they are so excited to visit my workplace.”

Adair and family at last year’s Christmas tree lighting on the Paramount Lot.

Lydia Daly, Social Media/Marketing, Viacom Velocity –

“I knew that Viacom was a great company for working moms on the day I returned to work after having my first baby (our second is due any day!). It’s a very emotional and sad day in many senses and yet I found I was surrounded by women who had been through this before and were able to provide support and reassurance. Family definitely comes first here and you can feel it.”

Daly and her family.

Joelle Fleming, Pricing and Inventory, BET –

“I received a call at work from my husband that we were selected as the pre-adoptive parents for two small children – and we had to pick them up that day.  I left the office, no questions asked, with the full support of my team and Viacom. The children have since been legally adopted, and we could not be more thrilled!”

Fleming with her family: John, Amber, Matty, Nikki, and Abby.

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Opening Their World to Open Adoption – With an Assist from Viacom

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom
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​​Nine years ago, George Pantelidis and his wife Larissa decided to restart their life. The native New Yorkers packed it in and headed west, landing in Santa Clarita, just north of Los Angeles, where the weather was nice and they could have a little more space. George had been stationed in the area when he served in the Marine Corp, and the couple thought it may be a great place to start a family.

Family is what they really hoped for. Part of what had driven them west was a string of unsuccessful attempts to create just that. Natural conception had not worked. IVF had failed. There had been miscarriages. It was time for a change.

They settled in. Larissa went to work for Wells Fargo. George wound up at Viacom, ingesting transcode for the digital media department.

In 2009, having exhausted all options to conceive a child, the couple drove south to Long Beach to attend an adoption symposium. It was there that they learned about something called open adoption, in which a pregnant mother selects the couple who will adopt their child at birth. At the adoptive parents’ discretion, the child could maintain contact with their biological mother. The moment they learned of it, the couple determined that open adoption suited their sensibilities perfectly.

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The Two Hispanic Moms: The Fortress Keeper and The Concierge

by Erica Saylor, Tr3s

Mother’s Day is almost upon us – a time for celebrating all that mothers do for their families. With the goal of uncovering what the Hispanic parents of today are really like, Tr3s talked to Latino families as part of its 2012 research study coined “Hispanic Adult Millennials Living The Next Normal: Age Of Uncertainty.”

While some young Hispanics are parents themselves, others still live with their parents. As a result, there are key generational differences between the two most prevalent types of households where young Hispanics reside – those in families that are just starting out, and those who have yet to strike out on their own and continue to live in multigenerational households. Read More

Hispanic Young Adults: Living With Mom and Dad, Happily

by Erica Saylor, Tr3s

Young Latinos have always been more likely to live with their families in early adulthood – and that is especially true today. With the cost of living on the rise and the recession making stable jobs a scarce commodity, moving out can be a major financial risk. As a result, Hispanics 18 to 34 are delaying forming their own households. Currently, 45% reside with their parents. Read More