Nine Quotes From Viacom’s Code B.L.A.C.K. Executive Panel On Building A Successful Career

 

My parents were born in an era where there were no African-American astronauts or African-American women CEOs, but as a millennial, I am blessed to live in era where representation is constantly part of conversations.

When The Beat, Viacom’s employee resource group devoted to the African-American experience, hosted Code B.L.A.C.K.: A Panel of Black Executives as part of its wide-ranging Black History Month celebration, I was grateful to be able to sit in this room of insightful leaders:

Trudi Patrick, Moderator – Executive Assistant –Advanced Advertising

Kodi Foster Senior Vice President of Data Strategy

Nadja Webb – Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel of Business & Legal Affairs

Michael Armstrong – General Manager of BET Networks

Ericka Wright Tomlinson Vice President of Human Resources for BET Networks and Viacom’s Finance, Core Services, Marketing & Communications teams

While we discussed the challenges of corporate politics, we also joked about things like reading The Shade Room for news. Representation matters and being in a room with other people who care about seeing and hearing from black executives was just what I needed this Black History Month.

Overall, I learned a lot from these executives. Here are my 10 favorite quotes from the event:

Viacom employees at the Code B.L.A.C.K. executive panel. From L to R: Gerald Yarborough, Essence Dashtaray, Georgette Pierre, Trudi Patrick, Nadja Webb, Destiney Bishop, Michael D. Armstrong, Kodi Foster, Ericka Wright Tomlinson and Ezinne Kwubiri.

“In 2007, I had a boss who was a control freak and was very territorial over her work and typically gave me work to do and she would present it in meetings. An opportunity came to launch a huge project and present it to [former head of MTV] Judy McGrath. At the time of this meeting she was traveling. Despite the fact that I did all the work, she told me to postpone the meeting. I spoke to my mentor who encouraged me to present the project I had been working on. So, after going back and forth, I made the executive decision to present it. After presenting it in front of so many senior people, they complimented me and told me I’d lead the project. I thought I was going to get fired, but that was the pivotal moment that I decided that I would present it and ask for forgiveness later and it ended up working out. I could have been the quiet little black girl in the back or decided to step up and do it and I decided to just do it and after that project, I presented it, and ended up getting promoted, which led me to the position I am in now.” – Wright Tomlinson

“Working on Wall Street, I was working late one day. I happened to answer the phone in the area known as the pit, even though I usually don’t answer calls, but I ended up having to explain to a couple in Iowa why their life savings was gone. It was kind of heavy. I was a kid, looking at numbers on spreadsheets and not putting human beings behind the numbers. That was when it hit me, that I wasn’t doing something constructive to better the world, which I feel like we do here by delighting people with entertainment and I decided to change careers.” – Foster

“It took me a long time to understand that you have to have agency over your career. No one else is going to do it for you. I made a classic mistake of trying to always work hard and expect people to notice and lift me up and give me opportunities but it’s on you. You have to identify what you want. If you’re stuck, you have to first identify what you want or think you might like to do and second is to communicate that to the stakeholders involved.” – Webb

“I think being ‘stuck’ in your career is relative. There’s a difference between you’re stuck versus it’s just not your time. Some of us are ready for the next step almost immediately while others are in the same position for over 20 years. There has to be a level of self-examination. Appreciate where you are, are you achieving your goals, and if you’re ready for the next step and not because you think you deserve it. Determine what your ultimate goals are.” – Wright Tomlinson

“I think managing corporate politics is simple. While it can be difficult and political, the easy part is if you show up as your true and authentic self, you don’t have to remember when you’re faking it and when you’re being real. That doesn’t mean you don’t have to calibrate. Knowing the environment, you’re operating in, if you need to adjust your authentic self, the people around you will let you know.” – Armstrong

Read More

Viacom Congratulates Cablefax’s Top Minority Executives

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

When Cablefax: The Magazine turned its September issue over to acknowledge top minority executives in video and broadband, we were not surprised to see Viacom well represented. Our brands have long prided themselves on diversity, from behind-the-camera talent to programming to our board of directors. Such strong representation on Cablefax’s list is encouraging as we work toward an ever more diverse media and entertainment landscape.

“[The individuals included on these lists] are leaders in all facets of the industry – and what they have to say, which sometimes includes criticisms of cable’s diversity status – are all important pieces of the conversation,” writes the magazine’s editorial director, Amy Maclean.

Cablefax divided their honors up into several categories, and Viacom executives landed on two of them – Leaders and Influentials. A brief overview of each list, along with the names of our honored employees, is below. Viacom congratulates the individuals in each category and thanks them for their vital contributions to our success.

The Leaders  

From Cablefax: “Our salute to the industry’s top 100 minority executives”:

Read More

Why Left Brain/Right Brain Is a Myth and More from Viacom’s Data Strategy Pro Kodi Foster

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

 

The PSFK conference is a big deal in advertising circles. Described this year by Media Village as “a TED for advertising and branding,” it drew the most forward-thinking minds from across the advertising landscape to New York City to discuss what’s happening and what will be happening in the fast-changing ad world.

It was no surprise to us, then, that Kodi Foster (follow him on Twitter @KodiFoster), Viacom’s vice president of data strategy, was invited to speak on the powerful, even necessary symbiosis of data and creative in the making of an effective piece of marketing or advertising.

In the 10-minute video below, Foster tunnels into how “…the terrible science around media is conducted…” and detonates some commonly held myths about perceived walls between art and science. He then outlines how his team is working across the company to improve the entire content marketing process.

Read More