Viacom Takes 5 Daytime Creative Arts Emmy Awards

Viacom took five categories (and earned one special recognition), at the 45th Daytime Creative Arts Emmy Awards, with Nickelodeon, Logo TV and MTV snagging statuettes for dazzling short-form digital content, feature-length films and children’s television.

Under the Nickelodeon umbrella, perennial fan-favorite SpongeBob SquarePants was recognized for its superb animated storytelling with two awards and a special recognition for its creator, Stephen Hillenburg, for his impactful work in the animation and broadcast world. Nick Jr. was awarded for Girls In Charge, an inspirational PSA aimed at preschool girls. The spot features fierce girl power courtesy of Nick Jr. girl characters, like Dora from Dora the Explorer and Nella from Nella the Princess Knight.

MTV and Logo TV both earned accolades for distinguished digital storytelling. Logo TV’s harrowing documentary on renowned makeup artist and LGBT figure Kevyn Aucoin (Kevyn Aucoin: Beauty & The Beast In Me) topped the Outstanding Special Class Special category. MTV won for its work creating a PSA, Undocumented and Afraid, for Logo TV’s film Forbidden, a motivational and informing film centered on LGBT-immigrant issues.

Take a look at Viacom’s winning content:

Nickelodeon

SpongeBob SquarePants – Outstanding Children’s Animated Series

SpongeBob SquarePants – Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program (Tom Kenny, as SpongeBob SquarePants)

Daytime Emmy Awards Special Recognition

Stephen Hillenburg, creator of SpongeBob SquarePants, earned a special recognition for his contributions to animation.

Nick Jr.

Nick Jr.’s Girls in Charge Campaign  Brand Image Campaign – Network or Program

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Comedy Central PSA Takes Action Against Sexual Assault

Comedy Central’s recent short-form video isn’t exactly slapstick humor. It’s a PSA in partnership with national organization #ItsOnUs, which is committed to ending sexual assault on college campuses.

The video features a young, male college student named Guy Davis. It’s narrated by a man with a deep, sonorous voice who deems Davis “Action Guy,” a heroic figure with superhuman powers to prevent sexual harassment, armed with a shield to repel obnoxious bros.

Picture a millennial Clark Kent at a frat house, who overhears an argument between fellow students. He rushes downstairs and finds a guy groping a young female student.

“Stop,” says the woman. “I said stop!”

Action Guy tells the jerk to leave her alone. The narrator makes a reference to “superhuman detection skills,” but Action Guy isn’t having it.

“I just heard her,” he says, looking perturbed. “With my ears.”

The message is obvious, but the PSA spells it out anyway: “Be an action guy: no superhero powers required.”

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Viacom Wins Social Good Category at 9th Annual Shorty Awards With Innovative Get Schooled Campaign

“Want to get that paper? You better turn in that paper.”

 – DJ Khaled, Major Keys Campaign

Since 2009, Viacom and Get Schooled have worked to motivate low-income students to graduate from high school and succeed in college, using cutting-edge technology and pop culture to pique kids’ interest in academia. One of Get Schooled’s most recent endeavors, a PSA called Major Keys Campaign that stars music mogul, DJ Khaled, won the Social Good Category—beating out 48 other entries—at the prestigious Shorty Awards, which honor talented content creators and producers on social media.

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What Kills More Americans Than Car Crashes or Guns? LISTEN for the Answer

Our nation is, without a doubt, in the midst of an addiction epidemic.

Nearly 21 million Americans are addicted to drugs or alcohol, making substance abuse as common as diabetes, and more prevalent than cancer. Drug overdoses killed more people in 2013 than car accidents and guns, and an alarming 1 in 7 people in the U.S. are now expected to develop a substance use disorder at some point in their lives.

So how do we turn the tide against this crisis?

It starts with getting rid of people’s long-held misconceptions. For many, that means removing the shame synonymous with substance abuse.

U.S. Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy, who today released the first-ever Surgeon General report on alcohol, drugs, and health, sums up the challenge this way: “We need to change the way we see addiction – not as a moral failing but as a chronic illness that we should approach with the same determination as we do diabetes, hearth disease, and cancer.”

This issue has touched the lives of tens of millions of Americans across the country. It’s the impetus behind MTV’s powerful documentary on opioid addiction, Prescription For Change: Ending America’s Opioid Crisis.

And it’s why Viacom announced yesterday the launch of “LISTEN” an awareness campaign in partnership with non-profit Facing Addiction to break down the stigma of addiction, promote resources to help those struggling with substance use, and encourage people to approach America’s addiction crisis with empathy, not condemnation. As informed citizens, actively listening to others impacted by this disease is the first step toward progress.

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Why “He Didn’t Mean It” Has Got to Go

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

We’ve all heard the excuses.

“Well, he was drunk.”

“But he’s such a nice guy.”

“He didn’t mean it.”

But they don’t excuse anything. For survivors of sexual violence, these words – their stubborn, insistent existence – only exasperates the pain.

But:

“He said he was sorry.”

“It was just a misunderstanding.”

“It only happened once.”

So what can be done? After all, boys will be boys. Right?

“It’s none of my business.”

“This is a women’s issue.”

“Yeah, no, we don’t talk about that.”

Right?

“We’re never gonna change it.”

“It’s sad, but, um, we’re never gonna fix it.”

The Joyful Heart Foundation does not believe that we will never fix this. That a culture that excuses rape and sexual assault is normal. That there are any excuses left. That boys will just always be boys, and what boys will be is dismissive, aggressive, willful, and, ultimately, excused.

The organization believes that we have had “Enough.” In a powerful new PSA campaign of the same name, produced in conjunction with Viacom Velocity, the organization commandeers these vile but pervasive words and challenges men to actively transform how we view and talk about sexual assault.

They brought company. Joyful Heart founder Mariska Hargitay, who also stars on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, rallied her costars and many other public figures to stand up against this archaic language: Andre Braugher, Andrew Rannells, Anthony Edwards, Blair Underwood, Chris Meloni, Daniel Dae Kim, Dann Florek, Danny Pino, Dave Navarro, David Marciano, Ice-T, Nick Lachey, Peter Hermann, Raul Esparza and Tate Donovan.

The series of PSAs, which will air across MTV, VH1, TV Land, BET, and Spike, among other Viacom properties, is a bold challenge to men: let’s change how we talk about this, so we can, some day, end it.

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The First Lady, Viacom and Get Schooled Move FAFSA-Forward

First Lady Selfie

First Lady Michelle Obama takes a selfie with Baltimore student Lawrence Lawson’s phone following a FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) workshop at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria, Va., Feb. 5, 2014. (Official White House Photo by Amanda Lucidon)

What do you get when you bring the First Lady, a high school valedictorian and Viacom’s most creative minds together? A true Viacommunity effort!

Teamwork, wit and humor were in the air two weeks ago as employee volunteers gathered to brainstorm. The assignment: a public service announcement (PSA) with First Lady Michelle Obama encouraging students to complete the FASFA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), as part of the “FAFSA-Forward” campaign from the Get Schooled Foundation and its founding partner Viacom. The campaign encourages students to get the money they need for their college education. Read More