Klepper’s Fake Fake News Show Debuts Strong As Comedy Central Sees Quarterly Ratings Rise

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

NEW YORK, NY – SEPTEMBER 25: Comedian Jordan Klepper hosts the premiere of Comedy Central’s “The Opposition w/ Jordan Klepper” on September 25, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images for Comedy Central)

Alarmed, self-satisfied, and wielding the confabulating vocabulary of the ever-growing alt-right pseudo-news complex, The Opposition w/ Jordan Klepper came burning out of its Midtown Manhattan bunker with a week one ratings victory.

Viewers eager to, as Klepper promised, “only hear from others what you’ve already been telling yourself,” drove ratings up 43 percent among total viewers compared to the same timeslot a year ago. The show, which follows The Daily Show with Trevor Noah Monday through Thursday on Comedy Central, averaged 683,000 total viewers in its first full week.

Since that strong debut, Klepper’s conspiracy-laced satire has continued honing its deft assault on the insipid fever dreams masquerading as news on Infowars.com, Breitbart News Network, and similar outlets. And like Stephen Colbert on Comedy Central’s long-running The Colbert Report before him, Klepper is spot-on lampooning his subjects by adopting their personas.

In the aftermath of last week’s mass shooting in Las Vegas, with Alex Jones busy papering together a schizophrenic collage assigning responsibility for the carnage to a vast deep state conspiracy, an alarmed Klepper reminds us that, “… the mainstream media is wasting our time conducting interviews, verifying sources, and trying to assemble an ‘accurate picture of the suspect’s background.’ Meanwhile, brave online truth-tellers like Infowars and Gateway Pundit are getting to these answers first. They get to their answers so fast, sometimes it feels like they didn’t even have time to think about them.”

Watch:

Flanked by a coterie of absurd citizen journalists, Klepper is pulling off his fake fake news show with a consistency that has impressed critics.

Read More

Jordan Klepper’s “The Opposition” to Resist the Resistance on Comedy Central

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

“Trevor, I’ve been on this show for over three years, peddling liberal talking points day in and day out,” longtime Daily Show correspondent Jordan Klepper told host Trevor Noah on a recent episode. “But then two months ago, I had two stark realizations: one, I’ve been living in a bubble; and, two, I didn’t have my own show.”

Consider both of those problems solved. The wry Klepper, whose recent Jordan Klepper Solves Guns special demonstrated his capability as a show captain, will star on The Opposition, a new late-night franchise beginning Sept. 25 on Comedy Central.

The Klepper that commands his own Comedy Central pulpit, however will be far from the liberal crusader who trolled pro-gun advocates and Trump supporters (watch his best moments here with your cable or service provider log-in). Instead, he will emerge as a self-certain crusader against the mainstream media, an alternative-media hero for, as Comedy Central describes it, “the America of paid protestors, Obama’s birth certificate, and the certainty that CNN is fake news.”

While the network hasn’t revealed the show’s exact format, you can get a sense of the tone and absurdist humor with this clip of Klepper at a Trump rally in Arizona, where he collects signatures on a petition to impeach Hillary Clinton (who currently holds no public office):

The table-thumping turnabout is, of course, sarcastic. But with so many late-night shows preoccupied with every political rumble out of Washington, Klepper knew he had to position this show differently.

“We have a lot of people [in late night] who are mad at what is happening, and they’re very articulate about their frustration,” Klepper told The Hollywood Reporter’s Lacey Rose. The new show will fill a gap, “showing where that [frustration] comes from and trying to satirize from that place. That’s what will hopefully feel fresh.”

Read More

#Farewell @midnight

by Stuart Winchester, Viacom

Comedy Central’s @midnight – which aired its final episode last Friday – had a nearly impossible premise: define the indefinable by corralling the social media mosh pit that the internet has become into something graspable and tangible. But for four years and 600 episodes, Chris Hardwick and an ever-shuffling crew of established and up-and-coming comedians did an admirable job of doing exactly that.

“Nothing else on television today has done as much to showcase the humor and improvisational abilities of stand-up comics and comedic actors. In fact, nothing else in the modern peak TV era has replicated what The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson did for comedy.” – Andrew Husband, Uproxx

The format was simple enough: each night, a panel of three comedians competed gameshow-style to contemplate internet-inspired queries in a sort of freestyle inverse Jeopardy, where there were no right answers, only clever ones.

What, for example, would be the most appropriate way to join the Koch Brothers’ celebration of fossil fuels for Earth Day? What would be an ironclad commandment for a theoretical Star Wars religion? If Pitbull ran for governor of Florida, what would his campaign slogan be? What, you are probably wondering, would be the advantages of global warming? Arden Myrin, Orlando Jones and Nimesh Patel have their ideas on that one:

The cornerstone of the show, of course, was #HashtagWars, the recurring segment that unleashed bizarre and – for the uninitiated – inexplicable trending Twitter threads every weeknight the show aired. In the final episode, Hardwick himself swerved into button-slamming mode, jumping in as a contestant for the first time in the show’s history, riffing on #BabyMovies, #DeadTV, #StonerBroadway, #AnimalMovies, #DrunkVideoGames and other topics among a rotating power panel of biting comics:

For this raucous, inspired and highly original platform, the show won two Emmys – for Outstanding Creative Achievement in Interactive Media Social TV Experience – in both 2015 and ’16, as well as copious praise from critics, who lauded the show’s role as a pipeline for emerging comedic talent.

Read More